CARYVILLE - JACKSBORO UTILITIES COMMISSION
WATER QUALITY REPORT 2020


Water Quality Regulations

The 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) regulates drinking water quality in the United States. It originally directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate 22 contaminants. Amendments to the act in 1986 dramatically increased the number of regulated contaminants to 92.

On August 6, 1996 Congress passed new SDWA amendments for the first time in 10 years. The new amendments gave the EPA the flexibility and direction to develop drinking water regulations that are more focused and less wasteful because they are based on health-effects data and solid science. The 1996 SDWA is truly a win-win situation for the EPA, the nation's water suppliers, and consumers. Public health is protected, and fewer resources are wasted.

One of the 1996 SDWA amendments requires water suppliers to publish and furnish to each water customer an annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) by July 1, 2020 Caryville-Jacksboro Utilities Commission (CJUC) has incorporated the CCR requirements into this annual Water Quality Report.

The EPA divides drinking water purity regulations into two major categories: primary standards and secondary standards. Primary standards focus on substances that can threaten public health. These standards are enforceable, and failure to meet them can result in fines or public notification requirements. We have conducted numerous tests for over 80 contaminants that may be in drinking water. As you'll see in the chart on the back we only had 14 detects at the Cove Lake Plant and 14 detects at Stony Fork. We found all these to be at safe levels.

Secondary standards serve as guidelines in setting levels for such aesthetic considerations as color, taste, and odor. These standards are recommended levels only and are not enforceable.

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation carries out the EPA's drinking water programs in Tennessee through its Division of Water Supply. The state must regulate water contaminants at least as strictly as federal law requires and has the right to regulate them even more strictly if needed

What is the source of my water?

August 27, 2004 you began receiving water from Norris Lake on Norris Dam side of Stokes Hollow. This is in addition to water from two wells on Ridge Road and Cave Springs on McDeerman Road. The Stony Fork Community receives water from two wells located at the fork of Cross Creek and Round Rock Creek south of Stony Fork Road. Our goal is to protect our water from contaminants and we are working with the State to determine the vulnerability of our water supply to contamination. The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) has prepared a Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) Report for the untreated water sources serving this water system. The SWAP Report assesses the susceptibility of untreated water sources to potential contamination. To ensure safe drinking water, all public water systems treat and routinely test their water. Water sources have been rated as reasonably susceptible based on geologic factors and human activities in the vicinity of the water source. The Caryville-Jacksboro Utilities water system sources are rated as reasonably susceptible to potential contamination. An explanation of Tennessee's Source Water Assessment Program, The Source Water Assessment summaries, susceptibility scorings and the overall TDEC report to EPA can be viewed online at: www.tn.gov/environment/dws/dwassess.shtml or you may contact the Caryville-Jacksboro Utilities to obtain copies of specific assessments. Caryville-Jacksboro Utilities Commission has developed an approved Wellhead Protection Plan. The Wellhead Protection Plan is available for inspection at the Utilities' Central Office.

Why are there contaminants in my water?

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. Community water systems are required to disclose the detection of contaminants; however, bottled water companies are not required to comply with this regulation. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

For more information about your drinking water, please call Franklin D. Wallace at 423-562-9776.
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How can I get involved?

Our Water Board meets on the third Thursday each month at Caryville - Jacksboro Utilities Main Office, located in the City Municipal Building, Jacksboro, Tennessee at 7:00 P.M. Please feel free to participate in these meetings.

Is our water system meeting other rules that govern our operations?

The State and EPA require CJUC to test and report on our water on a regular basis to ensure its safety. We have met all of these requirements. We want you to know that we pay attention to all the rules.

Do I Need To Take Special Precautions?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have under-gone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about not only their drinking water, but food preparation, personal hygiene, and precautions in handling infants and pets from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

Commonly Asked Questions About Drinking Water
Why do you add chlorine to the water?

Caryville-Jacksboro Utilities Commission (CJUC) uses chlorine in the water treatment process as a disinfectant. Chlorine was introduced into CJUC's water treatment process in 1951 and has been the disinfectant of choice since that time.
When free or uncombined chlorine is present in the water for a period of time, it reacts with natural organic compounds in the water to produce trihalomethanes (THMs) that may, at high levels be carcinogenic. The current EPA maximum contaminant level for THMs is 80 parts per billion. Both CJUC plants produce water that tests well below that limit. Future regulations may require even lower levels. We will continue to explore alternative treatment methods as new technologies become available.

Is bottled water safer than tap water?

Many consumers feel that bottled water is safer than tap water. This is generally not true. In fact, a recent study revealed that 25 percent of all bottled water is simply tap water that has been placed in a bottle and sold at a price 250 to 10,000 times higher than tap water. For example, a typical price for a one-gallon jug of bottled water ranges from $0.99 to $4.00 compared to $0.006 for a gallon of CJUC tap water.
The quality of bottled water can also vary greatly depending on its source, production process, packaging material, and shelf life before use. Until 1996, there were no proposed federal standards for bottled water; in many states it was unregulated. The 1996 SDWA amendments require bottled water to meet many of the same regulations as tap water for the first time.

Do I need a home water filter?

Independent agencies such as the Federal Trade Commission and Consumer's Union (publisher of Consumer Reports) have determined home water treatment devices are not necessary for health reasons if a public drinking water supply meets state and federal requirements. CJUC has always maintained a perfect record of compliance with regulated drinking water standards.
In an attempt to sell more water filters, some companies have used fear-based telemarketing tactics that question the safety of the local water supply. Caryville-Jacksboro Utilities Commission's water supply is safe-any assertion to the contrary is untrue.
If you have any questions regarding CJUC's water, or if you need consumer information on water filters, please contact CJUC at (423) 562-9776.

Is lead a problem in my drinking water?

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. CJUC is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. In an effort to maintain compliance with reporting requirements, this lead and copper informational statement has been revised from last year's CCR to include all required language as outlined in TDEC regulation 1200-5-1-.35(4)(d).

Why is my water rusty when I first turn it on?

As home plumbing systems made of galvanized iron get older, they may begin to corrode. If the water appears discolored when you turn it on but clears after a few minutes, the problem is your home plumbing system; it usually take a few minutes for fresh water from CJUC's water main to reach the faucet. There are no health effects associated with this problem and the EPA classifies iron as a secondary standard.

Does CJUC water have fluoride in it?

CJUC adds fluoride to its water supply to reduce tooth decay in children. Approximately .7 part per million of fluoride is recommended by the American Dental Association for maximum dental protection. This standard is recognized and utilized by CJUC. We do not add fluoride to the Stony Fork Wells.


Consumer Confidence Report

CJUC routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to federal and state laws. In fact, we perform many more tests than are required to provide our customers with the best water possible. As you will see in the following tables, showing the results of our monitoring of contaminants for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2019, our system had no violations. We're proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all federal and state requirements. Although monitoring did detect the presence of some contaminants in small quantities, none exceeded the acceptable levels established by the EPA, and the water CJUC provides to its customers IS SAFE. All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. It is important to remember that the presence of these contaminants does not necessarily pose a health risk.

Water Quality Data
What does this chart mean?

MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goal, or the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

MCL: Maximum Contaminant Levels are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.

AL -Action Level, or the concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Non-Detects (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - explained as a relation to time and money as one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter - explained as a relation to time and money as one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (nanograms/l) - explained as a relation to time and money as one part per trillion corresponds to one minute in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.

Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (picograms/l) - explained as a relation to time and money as one part per quadrillion corresponds to one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) - picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Millirems per year (mrem/yr) - measure of radiation absorbed by the body.

Million Fibers per Liter (MFL) - million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers that are longer than 10 micrometers.

Turbidity - Turbidity does not present any risk to your health. We monitor turbidity, which is a measure of the cloudiness of water, because it is a good indicator that our filtration system is functioning properly.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) - the level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) - the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for the control of microbial contaminants.

TT - Treatment Technique, or a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.


CROSS-CONNECTION INFORMATION

The Caryville-Jacksboro Utilities Commission makes every effort to ensure that our customers enjoy a continuous supply of safe drinking water. We appreciate the help of our customers to maintain the quality of our water supply.

Cross Connections can cause the water system to become contaminated. A cross connection is a link with the public water supply and a possible source of contamination. An example of a cross connection would be a garden hose submerged in a source of contamination such as a swimming pool, car radiator or other liquid. If a water main break should occur or if a fire pumper used a fire hydrant while the hose was submerged in a source of contamination, the contaminant could be pulled back into the public water supply. This occurrence, known as backflow, can be prevented.

One simple way to stop backflow is by using an air gap. An air gap can be created by arranging your hose so that the end is at least six inches above the top rim of the container it is being used to fill. This air gap will prevent the contaminant from being siphoned into the water supply.

Another method of preventing backflow with a garden hose is using a device known as a vacuum breaker. Vacuum breakers are inexpensive devices that can be screwed onto your outside faucet. These devices will prevent contaminants from being siphoned back into your plumbing and the public water system.


More hazardous cross connections or cross connections created with permanently installed plumbing may require more sophisticated devices known as reduced pressure backflow preventers. These devices are much more complicated and must be tested annually by certified testers. For more information on preventing cross connections and protecting our water supply, contact the Caryville-Jacksboro Utilities Commission at 423-562-9776

REMEMBER: Never submerge your garden hose in anything you would not want to drink!



Water Quality Data

COVE LAKE WATER PLANT

Unless otherwise noted the data presented in this table is from sampling performed during the 2019 calendar year.

Contaminant Violation Yes/No Level Detected Range of Detections Date of Sample Unit Measurement MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Total Chloroform Bacteria N 0 0 2019 0 1 positive sample/month Naturally present in the environment
Turbidity N 0.02 .02 to .25 2019 NTU N/A TT Soil runoff
Chlorine N 3.0 0.5 to 3.0 2019 PPM 4 4 Water additive used to control microbes
Gross Alpha N 2.4 ± 1.18 1.9 ± 1.0 2015 7/Yr. 0 4 Decay of natural and man- made deposits
Copper N 90th% =  .218 .013 to 1.18 2017 PPM 1.3 AL=1.3 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives
Fluoride N .77 .18 to .77 2019 PPM 4 4 Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories
Lead N 90th% = .178 ND to 14 2017 PPB 0 AL=15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits
Nitrate N 2.50 .494 to 2.50 2019 PPM 10 ppm 10 ppm Run off of fertilizer, Leach from septic sewer/erosion of natural deposits
Barium N .0276 .0239 to .0276 2015 PPM 0 2.0 ppm Discharge of Drilling Waste, discharge from metal refineries, erosion of natural deposits
Sodium N 3.97 3.97 to 2.21 2019 PPM N/A N/A Erosion of natural deposits; used in water treatment
Sulfate N 19.1 6.45 to 19.1 2015 PPM N/A N/A Naturally present in environment
Trihalomethanes N 82 Avg 14 2019 PPB .80 By-product of drinking water chlorination
Total Haloacetic Acids N 78 Avg 13 2019 PPB By-product of drinking water chlorination
Total Organic Carbons N 1.0 1.0 2019 PPM <2.0 mg/L <2.0 ppm or meet required % removal Naturally present in all waters formed by disinfectant reacting with natural and man-made chemicals

During the most recent round of Lead and Copper Testing, only one of the 30 household samples contained concentrations exceeding the action level.


Water Quality Data

STONY FORK WELLS

Unless otherwise noted the data presented in this table is from sampling performed during the 2019 calendar year.

Contaminant Violation Yes/No Level Detected Range of Detections Date of Sample Unit Measurement MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Total Chloroform Bacteria N 0 0 2019 0 1 positive sample/month Naturally present in the environment
Turbidity N .10 .03 to .10 2019 NTU N/A TT Soil runoff
Chlorine N 2.4 0.60 - 2.40 2019 PPM 4 4 Water additive used to control microbes
Gross Alpha N 0.16 ± 0.75 2015 Mrem/yr 7/Yr. 0 4 Decay of natural and man-made deposits
Nitrate N ND ND 2019 PPM 10 ppm 10 ppm Run off of fertilizer, Leach from septic sewer/erosion of natural deposits
Barium N .198 .198 2014 PPM 0 2.0 ppm Discharge of Drilling Waste, discharge from metal refineries, erosion of natural deposits
Sodium N 25.5 2019 PPM N/A N/A Erosion of natural deposits; used in water treatment
Sulfate N 16.5 2014 PPM N/A N/A Naturally present in environment
Trihalomethanes N 2018 PPB .80 By-product of drinking water chlorination
Total Haloacetic Acids N 9 2018 PPB By-product of drinking water chlorination
Copper N 90th% =  .092 .05 to .0974 2017 PPM 1.3 AL=1.3 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives
Lead N 90th% = .176 ND - .00234 2017 PPB 0 AL=15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits
Xylenes N ND 2019 PPB 10 10 Discharge from petroleum and chemical factories

During the most recent round of Lead and Copper Testing, none of the 5 households sampled contained concentrations exceeding the action level.

CARYVILLE-JACKSBORO UTILITIES COMMISSION HAS PARTICIPATED IN THE UCMR 4 MONITORING DURING 2019 BUT NO CONTAMINATES WERE DETECTED

SAMPLING DATES 5/1/19 5/21/19 6/5/19 6/19/19 7/5/19 8/7/19 8/21/19

UCMR4 Unregulated Contaminant

Unregulated contaminants are those for which EPA has not established drinking water standards. The purpose of unregulated contaminant monitoring is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is warranted. For additional information call the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.